Working Single Mum’s, By Receptionist Vanessa

Working day before kids:  
1.     Wake up
2.    Cook a healthy and nutritious breakfast
3.    Sit down and enjoy eating it, with a hot cup of coffee
4.    Have a shower
5.    Get dressed
6.    Go to work

Working day with kids:

1.    Wake up to a child’s foot on your face at 4am
2.    Wake up again from your child’s cat (that they just had to have) meowing in your face at 4:30am just because it can
3.    Drag yourself out of bed, convincing yourself you had a great sleep
4.    Attempt to wake up your child
5.    Get ingredients out to cook a healthy nutritionist breakfast
6.    Remove the cover from child’s bed to wake them up
7.    Begin to make breakfast – but get told your child needs a pirate costume for school today
8.    Panic
9.    Raid the cupboards to try and find a ‘pirate like’ costume
10.    Tell your child to get dressed
11.    Tell then again to get dressed
12.    Tell them again with threats of taking away their I-Pad to get dressed
13.    Make the kids lunch with what you can scrounge up from the fridge – remembering you needed to go shopping last week – but haven’t had time yet
14.    Finally get into the car.
15.    Remove the bird from your car and remind your child that they can’t bring the pet bird to school ‘so she looks more like a real pirate’.
16.    Drop off your child to school and head to work - realizing you haven’t made lunch for yourself, brushed your hair or cleaned your teeth yet
But the funniest thing of all.... I LOVE being a Mum.  I love the craziness.
 

Top Tips on Summer-Ready Feet - Healthy & Beautiful Nails- By Podiatrist Lachlan Newcombe

Now that we have entered the month of February, I think it's fair to say that SUMMER IS HERE! And you know what that means? This week our focus is on keeping your nails healthy and beautiful! Exciting, right? So let's get started!

Watch out for discolouration

There are many reasons why a nail can become discoloured. For instance, a yellowish, white patch on the nail can be caused by a fungal infection or pressure damage from wearing tight shoes. Such discolouration is usually more common in the big toenails simply because of the fact that they are the biggest nail and are more prone to damage.

Fungal infection is one of those things that is a bit clingy and likes to hang around. If you suspect that you may have caught a fungal infection in your nails, it is best to consult a podiatrist to ensure that a correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment is undertaken as soon as possible! Remember, early intervention is key. 

Black or grey discolouration is a sign of lack of oxygen to the nail. It usually happens following a trauma to the nail. In most cases, the nail may die off and become detached from the nail bed. Don't panic when it does because a new nail usually grows back! However, depending on the severity of the trauma, the extent of damage to the nail matrix determines the appearance of the new nail. As a result of that, the new nail that grows back may not look exactly the same as the previous one. 

Moisturise those cuticles

We have all had it - peeling, flaky cuticles that you just really, really want to peel off and push back. Please don't! Those cuticles actually act like a seal to stop water, bacteria and other nasty things from going into the nail fold. Without them, your nails and the surrounding skin fold have a much higher chance of getting an infection! So the best way to look after them is to put moisturiser on them regularly. This way the cuticle can grow back healthily and you will notice that the nails grow better as well!

Moderation is the key

We all love summer for a reason. We can show off those beautiful nail art! Choices are limitless and it's just simply fun! While nail polish can enhance the beauty of your nails, long term use often leads to weak, discoloured nails. Not only does nail polish stop the nails from breathing, the chemicals in it can also damage the nails. So what's the verdict? Moderation is the key. Make sure you schedule a few "days off" for your nails between each new application. If you start to notice a yellow stain on the nails, it is best to let the nails rest for at least a week before applying a new nail polish. 

So there you have it - our tips on keeping your nails healthy and beautiful this summer!

Any issues with your feet talk to our podiatrist 82216600 or book online at https://cheetah.cliniko.com/bookings#service

Your body is a temple...no its a dream home!! Treat it like one....

Too often we prioritise home improvements of the bricks and morter nature over maintaining our number one home....our body!! How often have you missed out on treatment with your Physio or Dentist because you would prefer to spend the cash on some material thing such as that new kettle that heats to the exact tempertaure you want or that hanging chair you saw online?!!! We are all guilty of it....Sometimes we need to be reminded of the amazing job our body does....it gives us life!! It is our dream home for life and there is no moving out of this one so maintenance is key. 

From an Allied Health point of view it is recommended you see your Musculoskeletal therapist, Acupuncturist or Podiatrist (for example) every 4-6 weeks once you have reached a level of body maintenance. It is always recommended that you come in for a thorough assessment to identify a treatment plan specific to your body and its needs. You may need to attend to its maintenance a little more frequently to begin with and then appointments can be spaced out as the body holds in a healthy state. 

So next time you think a trip to Kmart for some new homewares or Bunnings for a new paint colour is more important than visiting your Myotherapist or booking a Bowen treatment...then think again.... How are you going to physically redecorate if your dream home (your body) is falling apart?

 

 

 

Top Tips on Summer-Ready Feet and Nails - By Lachlan Newcombe - Podiatrist

Now that we have entered the month of November, I think it's fair to say that SUMMER IS COMING! And you know what that means? That means it's about time to wake up those hibernating feet of ours to get ready for summer! This week our focus is on keeping your nails healthy and beautiful! Exciting, right? So let's get started!

Watch out for discolouration

There are many reasons why a nail can become discoloured. For instance, a yellowish, white patch on the nail can be caused by a fungal infection or pressure damage from wearing tight shoes. Such discolouration is usually more common in the big toenails simply because of the fact that they are the biggest nail and are more prone to damage.

Fungal infection is one of those things that is a bit clingy and likes to hang around. If you suspect that you may have caught a fungal infection in your nails, it is best to consult a podiatrist to ensure that a correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment is undertaken as soon as possible! Remember, early intervention is key. 

Clingy Fungus?

 

Black or grey discolouration is a sign of lack of oxygen to the nail. It usually happens following a trauma to the nail. In most cases, the nail may die off and become detached from the nail bed. Don't panic when it does because a new nail usually grows back! However, depending on the severity of the trauma, the extent of damage to the nail matrix determines the appearance of the new nail. As a result of that, the new nail that grows back may not look exactly the same as the previous one.

Now that we have entered the month of November, I think it's fair to say that SUMMER IS COMING! And you know what that means? That means it's about time to wake up those hibernating feet of ours to get ready for summer! This week our focus is on keeping your nails healthy and beautiful! Exciting, right? So let's get started!

Watch out for discolouration

There are many reasons why a nail can become discoloured. For instance, a yellowish, white patch on the nail can be caused by a fungal infection or pressure damage from wearing tight shoes. Such discolouration is usually more common in the big toenails simply because of the fact that they are the biggest nail and are more prone to damage.

Fungal infection is one of those things that is a bit clingy and likes to hang around. If you suspect that you may have caught a fungal infection in your nails, it is best to consult a podiatrist to ensure that a correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment is undertaken as soon as possible! Remember, early intervention is key. 

Black or grey discolouration is a sign of lack of oxygen to the nail. It usually happens following a trauma to the nail. In most cases, the nail may die off and become detached from the nail bed. Don't panic when it does because a new nail usually grows back! However, depending on the severity of the trauma, the extent of damage to the nail matrix determines the appearance of the new nail. As a result of that, the new nail that grows back may not look exactly the same as the previous one. 

Summer Ready feet!

Moisturise those cuticles

We have all had it - peeling, flaky cuticles that you just really, really want to peel off and push back. Please don't! Those cuticles actually act like a seal to stop water, bacteria and other nasty things from going into the nail fold. Without them, your nails and the surrounding skin fold have a much higher chance of getting an infection! So the best way to look after them is to put moisturiser on them regularly. This way the cuticle can grow back healthily and you will notice that the nails grow better as well!

Moderation is the key

We all love summer for a reason. We can show off those beautiful nail art! Choices are limitless and it's just simply fun! While nail polish can enhance the beauty of your nails, long term use often leads to weak, discoloured nails. Not only does nail polish stop the nails from breathing, the chemicals in it can also damage the nails. So what's the verdict? Moderation is the key. Make sure you schedule a few "days off" for your nails between each new application. If you start to notice a yellow stain on the nails, it is best to let the nails rest for at least a week before applying a new nail polish. 

So there you have it - our two feet on keeping your nails healthy and beautiful this summer!

12 TIPS: HOW NOT TO HAVE A HOLIDAY BLOW-OUT, By Dr Carla Brion- TCM and Acupuncturist

With the silly season fast approaching, it’s a good idea to go into it with a bit of a plan. Have a strategy so you can avoid over doing it, keep your sanity and still feel great when you come out the other side after all the Christmas cheer has ended and the festive dust has settled…

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), it is believed that for health and happiness to flourish, one must live in harmony with the environment. This helps us to stay in balance mentally, physically and emotionally.

LOVE-Silly-Season.jpg

With December comes all the fun and festivities of the holiday season. It also marks the start of sweet, sweet summer. Summer is the most ‘yang’, warm and spritely time of year. ’Tis the season when we come alive and our Qi (vital energy) is at its fullest. Joy and happiness dominate our emotions and the seasonal energy is ascending and uplifting. However, to get the most out of this time of year and fuel our bodies natural high, we need to look after ourselves properly with extra self-love and care. Our Digestion plays a vital part in general health and emotional wellbeing in TCM, so it is important to support and nurture it, particularly when we all have a tendency to overindulge this time of year. But fear not, Christmas has come early this year with this little treat to help you beat the bulge (and bloat) these holidays.

Ban your holiday blow-out with these 12 hot tips….

:: Listen to your body! What is it really craving? What does it need? (And yes, I am POSITIVE, it doesn’t need that whole bottle of wine and entire christmas pudding with extra custard!)

:: Stay hydrated! Thirst can confuse your body for hunger but don’t let it fool you. To keep your water interesting, add cucumber, mint or lime so you get your 2+ litres a day in and cool your body at the same time.

:: Pre-Eat! Never arrive to parties or functions hungry. This helps you avoid binging on all the naughty foods. You’ll only want a little taste of party food rather than the entire party itself.

:: Pace yourself! We are all bound to overdo it at some point, but try not to fall down that slippery slope once you’ve started. Exercise portion control where possible, people. Tomorrow is a brand new day so don’t give up if you slip up a little.

:: Have strength! Keep the over-eating to Xmas say and New Years to ensure the holiday season doesn’t accidentally roll into mid January or even February… easy to do, I know! When January 2nd comes, you’re back in business and eating consciously!

:: Set a budget! Don’t overspend on unnecessary groceries. You’ll save cash and terrible wastage, and you won’t have the mountains of old leftovers that you’ll probably force yourself to eat.

:: Easy on the booze! Your liver doesn’t go on holidays just because it is Christmas, so be kind to it and pace yourself with the alcohol. You can avoid those nasty hangovers and the truck load of calories that go with it.

:: Eat mindfully! Try and eat slowly while sitting, chewing lots to really taste and enjoy your food. This way you’re less likely to eat yourself into a food coma.

:: Stay on track! Keep up with your exercise as much as possible. It will be easier to get back into it if you don’t completely fall off the wagon.

::Move after food! Take a walk after a big meal to aide the digestive process and fire up the metabolism.

:: Snack wisely! Eat fresh, seasonal fruit instead of leftover chocolate and lollies that you were gifted. Or better yet, re-gift them to someone else and pay it forward… (Let’s be honest here, we’ve all done it!)

:: Take a pro-biotic every day to support digestion, gut health and increase nutrient absorption.

Remember to enjoy yourself and be merry! Indulge in moderation – and with mindfulness. You’ll have a happier gut and a healthier body so you won’t have to add ‘GO ON A DIET’ to your New Years resolutions because we all know that’s one you’re never going to keep and diet’s are no fun at all!

Carla xx

Mindfulness, by Bowen Therapist Leanne Martin

Photo Credit: Whole Body Intelligence

Photo Credit: Whole Body Intelligence

Mindfulness, to be in the present moment, to deliberately bring 100 percent of your attention to whatever it is you are doing, right now, in this moment. You could read this blog mindfully or with a mind not fully focused and aware that you are even reading this article – We have all got to the bottom of a page in a book and not had a single clue about what we have just read. Don’t tell me I am the only one with wandering mind and spinning thoughts at times. This is a big signal that its time to tune in, to slow down, to be present, to be mindful.

Everything except sleep can be done mindfully, we can eat mindfully, and we can walk mindfully, read mindfully, work mindfully, even just sit and be – mindfully. With each of these acts bringing intent and presence instead of just going through the motions of life. Daily mindful practice can help us to remain aware, and present during all situations in life, not just being present in the moment but also being present within our bodies and minds as well.

One of the main reasons to have a daily mindful practice is to become more aware of our own thoughts, feelings and behaviours. To observe our minds habits and to tune in and take note of the physiological changes that occur with certain thoughts and feelings.  The more we practice being mindful in simple everyday tasks the more control we have over our minds when things get a little tough or difficult situations present themselves.

We can train our minds like any other part of our being, and there are benefits from understanding how it works and reacts. Practising mindfulness can have so many benefits.

1.      Stability of mind – maintaining your mind in an alert clear space rather that at the two extremes of a cloudy disengaged mind to an agitated, stressed mind.

2.      Flexibility of mind – the ability to shift your mind to whatever situation or task you choose rather than having to bounce haphazardly between a number of issues or tasks.

3.      Self-awareness – being aware of the contents of your mind and understanding the typical patterns your individual brain constructs.

4.      Acting rather than reacting – becoming less reactive and understanding you are in control of how you are being and feeling in any moment.

It does take a little practice but that practice doesn’t have to be hard. Like any other form of therapy real change requires commitment and repetition, small daily changes can have huge positive outcomes in the long term. So why not start today, what is the next task on your to do list – your next action? I challenge to do this mindfully, to mentally set the intention of the task, to bring your awareness to each individual movement or action, to observe your thoughts, keep you mind fully focused on what your are feeling, thinking, experiencing with the task at hand.

Practising mindfulness aims to allow us to see our thoughts and emotions for what they really are, judgements we are having in the moment and feelings we are currently experiencing. Our minds begin to understand that our thoughts have no hold, no bearing over us unless we attach to them, feed them, fuel them, and believe them without question. We start to grasp the concept that we are not our emotions and see them for what they truly are, a feeling that is strong within us at this time but as everything will pass. These emotions do not define us. When we start to disassociate our thoughts and emotions our minds cease to be in control of those harmful strong reactions and habit patterns and slowly but surely become under our own control and intention once again. 

Photo Credit: Whole Body Intelligence

Photo Credit: Whole Body Intelligence

Are you ready?

So despite the fact that it’s only days away and you’ve decided to enter the 2016 Gravity Enduro National Championship at the last minute. You may have been feeling brave about it after your third beer with the boys in the shed whilst unwinding from your last ride but now the reality has hit and you’re actually committed. So, with only a few days to go what can you do to optimise your performance on the day?

Training: On the lead up to the start of the race you won’t be going from zero to hero but you still will be able to improve your base level fitness significantly. Building up your cardiovascular energy system in a short period of time is much more realistic than trying to build muscle in a short period of time, so instead of making your leg muscles more developed the focus should be on training what you’ve got and making that as rock solid as possible. It’s worth sitting down and having a look at the training you’re doing at the moment and just seeing how compatible that is with the upcoming race. If you know the race will have short, steep climbs and long flats, then repeatedly doing your local DH (downhill) loop, although probably a lot more fun, isn’t specific enough of a training type to optimise your performance on the day. Even marathon runners train at a variety of intensities and there’s no reason why it’d be any different on a bike. Although, you may expect the course or conditions to be one way things can change on the day, weather can play a role etc. Getting in a variety of training loads/intensities can make you a more rounded rider and set you up to be better prepared for any race day emergencies that may occur. Besides your race specific training consider adding the following into your training schedule to make you a more rounded, more prepared rider:

1.     Repeated hill sprints

2.     Riding the same section repeatedly but using different gears to work your cardiovascular system and muscles in unique ways

3.     Holding an unfamiliar pedalling cadence for a short familiar loop

4.     Session purely focusing on pedalling technique

Hydration/food: One important thing to realise with hydration that a lot of people neglect is that there’s only so much hydrating your body can do 2 hours before the race. Although this definitely is an important time to be taking fluid in, the 2-3 days leading up to the event is equally as important. Hydration, just like fitness doesn’t happen overnight, if you want your body to be optimally hydrated you have to start putting in a conscious effort to keep your levels topped up days before the race. With our muscles comprising of about 70-80% water it just makes sense to give the body more of what it wants.

Everyone is different and there are many figures floating around out there both in text books and in the black abyss of Google regarding just how much water we need for optimum performance. The general consensus is that 2-4L of water is sufficient. Obviously if you’re a 6’6” 110kg male who sweats a lot you’re going to be towards the higher end of the spectrum for necessary water intake and if you’re a 5’2” 50kg woman who’s always freezing you’re likely going to be towards the lower end of the spectrum. However sweat rates, body temperature, etc are highly specific so always listen to your body and err on the side of caution.  
Regarding what to use for hydration generally a mix of fluids is the best. Consider running water in your drink bottle but some sort of electrolyte based sport drink (Hydralyte, Gatorade, etc) in your Camelback. Water is great at re-hydrating you but if you’re a heavy sweater additional to the fluid you’re sweating out you’ll also need to replace those salts and minerals that you’re losing via sweat and a sport specific drink is the most appropriate tool for the job.

Stretching: Every day we’re learning more and more about stretching, all the different types of stretching that exist and how each type effects athletic performance. One thing we’re moving away from is static stretching. An example of a static stretch you may be familiar with would be down at your local footy oval you might have seen the local footy players doing static hamstring stretches before the game begins. This is a prime example of how we DON’T want to stretch immediately before attempting to display the peak physical excellence we’ve trained so hard for! Although there are more and more studies coming out daily we currently know that holding a stretch for long periods of time (30sec-2min) will immediately and measurably decrease your peak power output and with no measurable decrease in injury rates between those who did or did not static stretch before the event (a pre-event, sport specific warm up is much more valuable in decreasing injury rates). The type of stretches you do before the race should be vastly different to those you do after the race too. As a general rule of thumb you want to take the sport specific joints through their typical ranges of motion briefly so you still lengthen the muscle fibres and prepare them to do so during the event but it’s not necessary or helpful to keep them in that position for extended periods of time. When you see the football players swinging their legs in the air kicking imaginary footballs this is an example of a sport specific stretch that will not have a short term negative effect on performance. After the event is finished is when it’s appropriate to spend more time in each position really giving the muscle time to decrease it’s resting tone and lengthen back to its normal length. Remember we want to stretch to strain not pain so make sure the stretches aren’t painful or excessively uncomfortable. 

https://cheetah.cliniko.com/bookings#service

Or

8221 6600

Matthew Grosser, Ad. Dip. (Myotherapy) AAMT
SA Integrated Therapies
225 Grote Street, Adelaide SA 5000
Phone: (08) 8221 6600
Website: www.saintegratedtherapies.com.au

Concussion: The invisible injury

There’s been a lot of talk about concussion in collision sports such as AFL and Rugby League. Often we do not consider that concussion is an occurrence that can happen in many sports, this no more relevant than in Mountain Biking.

There is a cycling saying that it is not ‘if’ you fall off your bike, but ‘when’ you fall off your bike. As fun and adrenaline pumping as this mountain biking is, things can go pear shaped very quickly.  Just check out Pinkbike’s fails of the month - cringe worthy!

WHAT IS CONCUSSION?

When you take a violent blow to your head and neck or upper body this can cause your brain to slide back and forth forcefully against the inner walls of your skull causing inflammation and possible bleeding.

The most severe repercussion from a head trauma can be massive internal bleeding that if not addressed immediately can lead to death.  Fortunately, this is rare, but it does happen.

Generally a concussion will cause bleeding in and around your brain, symptoms can be subtle and difficult to detect, careful observation of a fellow rider after a heavy fall is critical.

It is important that once you, or your riding buddy are aware that a serious trauma to the head has taken place, you stop riding immediately, or get to the nearest pickup point.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR:

Symptoms may include any number of the following:

  • Loss of consciousness

  • Memory loss of the event and the period after

  • Drowsiness

  • Confusion – sometimes not immediately

  • Headache

  • Dizziness and visual disturbances

  • Ringing in the ears

  • Nausea

  • Vomiting

  • Slurred speech

  • Delayed response to questions

  • Appearing dazed and foggy

  • Fatigue

Note:  Symptoms can hang around for hours, days or even weeks!

HOW TO AVOID CONCUSSION

The best way to avoid concussion is to stay upright!  Make sure you have the skill level and the right bike under you for the terrain you are on.  But, let’s be honest you don’t get better if you don’t push yourself out of your comfort zone, right?  So, we jump a little further, pin it a little faster and rail it a little harder.  And, in these cases, where there’s a good chance that at some point you may become well acquainted with the ground, you want the appropriate protective gear. Including the trusty old helmet.  The beauty of a helmet is that in most cases it’ll save your life or prevent a seriously sore noggin. But if you happen to hit the ground hard enough or at the wrong angle your gelatin textured brain will still get shaken to hell and back through the cerebrospinal fluid inside your skull.

*  It is recommended that after a heavy fall you replace your helmet as it may not work so well second time round.

TREATMENT

The following are general guidelines on when someone should seek immediate medical advice after a fall.  The affected person may not be of sound mind to make the necessary decisions, so their riding buddy, partner or family member may be the one who needs to make the call.

  • Vomiting and nausea

  • Loss of consciousness

  • Memory loss

  • A continually worsening headache

  • Changes in behavior, such as irritability

  • Impaired coordination

  • Confusion or disorientation, such as difficulty recognising people or places

  • Slurred speech or other changes in speech

  • Seizures

  • Vision or eye disturbances, such as pupils that are bigger than normal (dilated pupils) or pupils of unequal sizes

  • Lasting or recurrent dizziness

  • Difficulty with mental function or physical coordination

  • Symptoms that worsen over time

If an injured rider, assessed by a medical practitioner, is given the all clear it is still recommended they be woken every 4 hours on the first night after the trauma to make sure that all symptoms are stable, if not, to the emergency room it is!

RECOVERING FROM A CONCUSSION

concussion head brain.jpg

Kevin on recovery…

My best piece of advice would be to rest, relax and to not get back to your work too quickly.  Do not get back to your sport until you’re healed.  It’s so hard to know how long you need to take off but you go and talk to somebody to find out.  The hardest thing to do is to take that action to go and really get checked out by a doctor, it’s what I didn’t do.  As an athlete the last thing you want to do is to have someone tell you that you can’t participate in your sport.  I wish that I had taken the right steps.”

Not unless a concussion is severe enough to be causing further complications, there is no treatment. However, after an injured person has been thoroughly assessed by a medical practitioner and given the all clear, there are things that can be done to help the body and brain speed up the healing process.

  • Rest, relax and sleep – No riding other than on a stationary bike. Boring, I know!

  • Reduce stress

  • Take Longvida Curcumin, this natural anti-inflammatory factor is derived from the spice turmeric and can be absorbed into the brain  

  • Take fish oils – essential for neural health

  • Take part in regular exercise, but not any that will put you at further risk of trauma

  • Use your brain, make it think, play games, do puzzles, mind teasers – this will help regenerate damaged pathways and stimulate new connections

The hardest thing for us riders, because the sport is just so damn fun, is staying off your bike.  You should not return to riding while signs or symptoms of a concussion are present and it is only safe to do so once you have been medically evaluated by a health care professional.

Lastly, when the headaches have subsided and the mind is clearing it’s not uncommon the neck and shoulders start killing!  Often concussion goes hand in hand with whiplash type injuries and other neck or shoulder trauma. Initially these are far less important, unless your collarbone is sticking out of your chest and you are quickly bleeding to death! (can happen, but unlikely). Deal with the concussion first then have your musculoskeletal ailments attended to as these too can lead to poorer bike handling, pain, discomfort and generally make riding and life less enjoyable – nobody needs that!

If a second impact should occur in a week or two following the initial injury serious fatal bleeding is far more likely to occur. Firstly, do not put yourself at risk (read below), and secondly, if you do ride and fall, seek medical aid immediately, even if you think you feel all right.  

Those having suffered from concussion are 50% more likely to develop epilepsy in the five years following the injury, and post concussion vertigo and headaches may last for weeks or months after a trauma.  It is also possible with multiple concussions that irreparable damage and impairment may occur to certain parts of the brain - boxing and UFC type sports are good examples of this!

Riders and officials involved in any activity, be this competitive or recreational should make themselves familiar with the signs and symptoms of concussion to enabling them to assist others and even perhaps recognise these signs in themselves should an incident occur where a head trauma could lead to a concussion.

Concussion is serious!  Look after yourself and your fellow riders.

Bring on the Aussie Gravity Enduro Champs!

Written by Steve Moore, Musculoskeletal Therapist avid Road Cyclist and crazy Mountain Bike rider for the 2016 Gravity Enduro National Championships powered by SRAM - http://www.mtba.asn.au/event/enduro-national-champs/

Disclaimer: This article is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical advice, assessment and treatment by a qualified practitioner. Your outcome after a head injury is your responsibility and neither Steve Moores, SA Integrated Therapies, Inside line MTB or Gravity Enduro SA takes responsibility for your outcomes based on this article.

Let's Get Running, by Podiatrist, Lachlan Newcombe

LETS GET RUNNING!

As the weather warms up, dust off the winter cobwebs on your running shoes and hit the streets to prepare for the spring running season.

Running injuries are very common. Any repetitive high force activity can cause problems and injuries. So how can they be prevented?

As the big runs of the spring session approach you may be tempted to really up your game and km's. However when training for a big event going too hard or a rapid increase in the training loads can become too much for your body, and it’s at this point where injuries can be more common.

Its easy to become frustrated with injuries and try to run through them or up the load because there is an event in a few weeks and you need to train. But you might just need to rest and try again next year.

TRAINING TIPS:

Try these tips to improve your body’s ability to handle changes in activity and increases in training load.

-If you have a niggling pain that annoys you on a typical road training run, try breaking up your training sessions with running on a diffrent surface eg grass or gravel run.

-Instead of trying to run a long distance in one go, try doing it in 3 runs – you will still get the mileage, and protect your body.

-Try a new shoe or have a different set of runners for training. Our podiatrist can advise on the best pair of runners for your feet. With so many options it can be difficult to work out whats best for you.

-Cross training. Try riding a bike, swimming or an exercise class instead of that 4th run for a week. Variety is the spice of life.

-Always cool down after a run, finish with a few minutes walking or stretching, this is particularly important if you are running or exercising a few days in a row.

TRY THESE TIPS IF YOUR FEET ARE GETTING SORE:

-Rolling your feet over a tennis ball.
-Foam rolling your legs.
-Deep Heat or flexall for muscle pain.
-Using second skin type dressings if you get blisters on longer runs.
-Try thicker socks or toe socks if you get blisters between your toes.

Happy running is our aim, if your running is unhappy make an appointment with our Podiatrist at

https://cheetah.cliniko.com/bookings#service

Or

8221 6600

And let's make running happy and fun again.

Lachlan Newcombe | BPod, MAPodA.
Member Australian Podiatry Association
SA Integrated Therapies | Mondays 3pm - 7pm & Tuesday 3pm - 8pm
225 Grote Street, Adelaide SA 5000
Phone: (08) 8221 6600
Email: podi.podiatry@gmail.com | Website: www.saintegratedtherapies.com.au

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Matthew Grosser is a qualified Myotherapist, his keen interest in anatomy and sport has led to his passion for helping others perform at their peak, recover from injuries and avoid chronic pain.

What to expect during and after treatment?
During the treatment there may be certain techniques that feel unpleasant or uncomfortable but the therapist will endeavour to make the session as pain free but as effective as possible. At all times open dialogue is available and encouraged between the therapist and the client to make sure necessary pressure is being applied and that things aren’t getting too uncomfortable. Although treatment doesn’t have to hurt to be effective (this is a total myth) often the tissue the therapist will choose to work on may be hypersensitive (excessively sensitive) to pain or pressure so some unpleasantness at times is to be expected.

Some of the techniques used and what to expect...
  • Myofascial Dry Needling (MDN) – This is probably the one that I get asked the most about as a therapist. Myofascial Dry Needles (MDN) are a different length and diameter to most acupuncture needles due to the differences in the way they work. The needle we typically use is 0.3mm in diameter, this is many, many times smaller than an injection or blood drawing needle and subsequently the pain associated with using it is significantly less almost to the point where most clients don’t actually realise when the needle is put in or taken back out.
  • Transverse Frictioning – As the name suggests transverse frictioning (TF) requires pressure to be applied repeatedly across (transversely) the direction of the muscle fibres.
  • Deep Tissue Massage –  Deep Tissue Massage is a tried and true technique heavily studied in regards to tissue healing, sports performance and its positive psychological effects.
  • Dynamic Cupping –  Dynamic cupping uses plastic cups and the use of a suction gun to apply the vacuum instead of the TCM way which typically uses glass cups coated with alcohol on the inside before a flame is applied to create the vacuum. Dynamic cupping is exactly what it sounds like, the cup is continually moved around the body to avoid bruising the skin. The mechanisms it works by are completely different to TCM.

 
 
 
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OUR TEAM:
Matt works within our team of highly trained, enthusiastic and genuine therapists who make up SA Integrated Therapies.
The services we offer include Musculoskeletal Therapy, Physiotherapy, Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine, Podiatry, Bowen Therapy, Myotherapy and Remedial Massage.
What set's our team of allied health professionals apart from others?....we are a true team who work together to ensure the best possible care for each individual client....we're here for YOU!

Shoulder Structure, by Physio Dave Boyd

Since we decided to stop walking on all fours and start reaching up into the trees for delicious red fruits, our shoulders have changed from a stable joint (like our hip-a true ball and socket joint), to a mobile and much less stable joint. Having mobility in our upper limbs lets us do lots of cool things like put on make-up and take high-angled selfies. Unfortunately when we have pain in them, they significantly affect our lives, not just because of the cool things we can’t do, but the not-so-cool things like eating and getting dressed also become really difficult tasks. Shoulder injuries are something we see very often here at SAIT. They can be from a traumatic injury, from overuse, or just slowly develop over time. Read on if you have an interest in the basic anatomy and function of the shoulder and the most common presentation we see.

Shoulder Structure

The shoulder is comprised of the shoulder blade (scapula) and the arm bone (humerus). The humerus has a golf-ball sized end on it (without the indentations) which meets with a small, shallow dish (similar to a golf tee) on the scapula. There are 4 main muscles that keep the golf ball (head of the humerus) on the tee (the glenoid fossa). Collectively they are called the rotator cuff and there is:

- One on top (supraspinatus)

- Two at the back (Infraspinatus and Teres Minor)

- One at the front (subscapularis)

When you move your arm, you call upon the big-thugish muscles (deltoids, pectoralis major and latisimmus dorsi, just to name a few) to do the heavy lifting, however they don’t just move your arm, they also create a force inside the joint pulling the golf ball away from the tee. The rotator cuff muscles are constantly cleaning up after these big-thugs by fine tuning the movement and keeping that ball sitting nicely on the tee.

Unfortunately the rotator cuff can easily be overworked over a long period, or just have one bad day and become a bit disgruntled. When they are in this state, they can go on strike either by themselves or with a couple of their workmates (they will even join structures from other departments such as bursae, cartilage and nerves on strike).  This can result in the not-so-bright prime movers mentioned before to start pulling the golf ball off the tee. This can result in pain; pinching pain, shooting down the arm pain and achey shoulder pain just to name a few.

To get these rotator cuff muscles off of strike and back to work, they need a bit of compensation in the form of a TLC pay-out. To begin with this involves hands-on therapy to help them to relax and actually begin negotiating with the guys in the office (the brain) to return to work. However, as they have had some time off, their return to work pathway must be slow and specific for their role. This comes in the form of specific recruitment and strengthening exercises.

Rotator cuff traumatic injuries (falling on your shoulder) or overuse injuries (serving too many 200km/h serves) are not the only type of injuries in the shoulders, there are many other structures around the shoulder that can and do get injured or overused. In almost all circumstances however, the rotator cuff are avid union members and if there is any sign of anyone else going on strike, they’ll also kick up a fuss and join them. So not only are they imperative for mobility and stability, but they are also team players having a significant role in any shoulder pain.

If you think your rotator cuff muscles are on strike, or even discussing the possibility of strike, contact us at SAIT for a thorough assessment and a return-to-work plan.

Equine Therapies 4 The Rider, By Kylie Roesler

As riders, our posture on the horse is the same as it is off the horse.  It is really hard to have good posture for the hour you ride your horse if you have bad habits or poor posture the other 23 hours.  To improve your posture on the horse, you need to improve your posture off the horse, and that’s where Equine Therapies: 4 The Rider can help.


Talking from personal experience, my right hip is higher than my left when I’m out of balance and in need of treatment.  For my everyday life that will mean I’ll wear out my left shoe faster, my left jean leg will drag on the ground, and my skirts will always slide around.  On my horse, it means I put more weight on my left seat bone, and through my left stirrup (especially when jumping).  Which in turn means I have trouble getting my left hip up and forward for left canter lead; my horse drifts left (until they learn to ignore my imbalance); I have greater trouble sitting trot; and I will give my horses not as smooth and comfortable ride as I can otherwise.
And that’s only looking at my hips!  


What if its your feet joints that are locked up, meaning you can’t flex through your ankle.
Or you’re hunched over like the Hunchback Of Notra Dame (maybe an exaggeration) from too many hours in the office – how do you expect to sit any differently on your horse?
And your riding instructor may say to you – “be softer through your heels”, or “open your chest, close the distance between your shoulder blades, sit tall”… And you may achieve it for a little while, by the sheer idea of holding yourself in correct posture will create TENSION, something that we all know riders strive never to do.
So what to expect when you visit us, and why are we different to your physio or massage therapist down the road?


We will look at you, and you and your horse (either through video images or visit by a visit to your place) to assess, treat (check out our website or our Blog to find out more), teach specific exercises and stretches for your muscloskeletal issues, liaise with your instructor / horse physio to discuss activities that will help your posture on and off your horse.

Core Strength, by Physiotherapist Dave West

What is core strength? Is it six-pack abs? or pelvic floor? Or something else…..

What are the best exercises…….?

Pilates purists might tell you that the most important abdominal muscles to train are those that comprise the deep core, together forming a metaphorical barrel that provides stability and subsequent protection of its contents; the lumbar spine and pelvis. I don’t disagree with this concept, these are important muscles for spinal stability, but are they the most important..?


There is an extensive body of literature supporting the effectiveness of Pilates for general spine health and rehabilitation from injury, though the prescription of Pilates exercises will vary depending on the instructor and available equipment.

 

Athletes may choose more dynamic, dare I say it ‘functional’, exercises to train the ‘core’. When done correctly, exercises like the Turkish Get-up or Pallof Press integrate stabilisers and prime movers not just of the trunk, but also the hip and shoulder. Exercises of this nature will yield the best results in regard to function and performance. However, these are advanced movements that will have beginners struggling to recruit the correct muscles to move well.

Pallof Press

 

A typical body builder will probably care about more superficial muscles of the abdomen; the rectus abdominis (six-pack) and external obliques. They may choose spinal flexion and rotation exercises to train these muscles, like a crunch or Russian twist. Like any repeated, loaded movement these exercises can induce muscle damage and drive the desired physiological adaptations, maybe you even get ‘toned’ or ‘fully jacked and swoll’ like Arnie (what a legend).

However, what we know about trunk flexion (bending forward), is that it’s a good way to damage spinal disc tissue, whether through sit up repetitions or prolonged, slumped sitting at your desk or on the couch.

Some people may execute these exercises well and never experience any direct pain as a result. Though why not choose alternative exercises that can achieve similar results with a reduced risk of spinal injury.

So what to do?

Train your trunk muscles to hold a neutral spine.

I recommend the best place to start is with the humble plank. The plank or prone bridge is an exercise that most beginners may have heard of, or attempted. It is sometimes downcast by more advanced gym goers as ineffective or too easy, though when done correctly it is a great way to train the body to hold a neutral spine.

Anatomical neutral is how the spine best absorbs stress, not through flexion (bending), extension (arching) or rotation (twisting). Hence, the best way to strengthen trunk muscles and reduce injury risk are to teach them to anti-extend, anti-flex and anti-rotate, holding neutral.

Understand neutral spine, find it, and teach your trunk muscles to hold it! Achieve this first and you will soon be able to progress to more advanced, dynamic exercises that train not only the trunk muscles but the whole body synergistically.

The essence of ‘core strength’ is recruitment, strength and endurance of the muscles that control the spine, not just the deep core or the superficial muscles, but all of the trunk muscles working in various task specific combinations. 

 

For further advice on spinal health, stability and performance training come in to SA Integrated Therapies to help achieve your goals.

 

Grote Street Clinic Tour, by Ashton at SA Integrated Therapies

Welcome to our Grote Street Clinic....

Where the space is ever evolving into what we like to call an Allied Health Clinic that breaks all the rules....in the very best way! We are not your cliche` sterile, white waiting room with posters that make you think you have all kinds of diseases and problems...our clinic is warm, welcoming, interactive and fun!! Our treatment rooms are private, fresh and spacious so our therapists can demonstrate stretches, assess your posture and scribble funny quotes and pictures on the black boards.

I could go on about the amazing strength and conditioning gym facilities we have, the eco-friendly fittings or our cafe corner with a real barista style coffee machine....but by now I'm sure you can tell we are proud of the space we work in and love being here to help you!! This is what I believe to be the best part of our clinic, we all enjoy being here, working together as a team to achieve the best possible results for you, our clients!

So...without further ado...check out this video that our friend Sarah, from Brion Photography put together for us...it captures just what SA Integrated Therapies is all about...and you can check out our awesome clinic and amazing team.

SA Integrated Therapies....a team of dedicated Allied Health Professionals, breaking the rules...in a good way!

Postural Health, by Myotherapist Matt Grosser

Tips for postural health

1.       Let’s get physical!

Something we hear all the time is that we should all be stretching more. It no longer seems to be an issue of education as most people are aware that regular stretching of the correct muscles can go a long way to correcting poor posture. There are key muscles that are commonly short and tight that our posture could benefit from that are especially prevalent in Western Society (typically desk bound workers). These muscles have a tendency to get tight due to the excessive sitting that our jobs often require us to do.

Pec stretch – This is a stretch to lengthen the pectoral muscles (chest muscles). It’s important that these are stretched properly on a regular basis to help allow the shoulders to remain in a neutral position. This will go a long way to ensuring correct movement and function through the thoracic and cervical spine (mid-upper spine) as well as the shoulder joint itself

Psoas stretch – Psoas (pronounced so-az), is our strongest hip flexor and therefore has the most control over our lower back and hip posture. If this one gets tight it can create a ‘duck bum’ posture, known as an anterior pelvic tilt. This leads to a dysfunctional lower back/pelvis posture and if often the cause of low back pain

2.       E.T. foam home

We’re often pulled into poor posture by muscles that are short and tight. This is why we regularly feel like we have to force good posture. Good posture shouldn’t have to be forced because it’s how the body best operates. To achieve good posture a foam roller or trigger point balls (tennis balls are adequate for beginners) can be very useful. I like to keep mine in the lounge room so I can watch t.v. while I roll my tired, aching muscles back to health.

Rolling the hip flexors – As you can see here using the foam roller isn’t necessarily the most elegant way to release short and tight tissue but it is a great way to be able to do some homework between sessions and kick-start your body back to great musculoskeletal health.

3.       Variety is the spice of life

Although not everyone has time to attend a Yoga or Pilates session daily we do all have time to change from our resting position at work. It doesn’t matter how busy you are at work you should always be able to make time to get up, do a quick lap around the office, stand up and sit down a few times, drink some water and be ready to refocus on the task at hand. If it helps, try making a list of what you will do in your break so as soon as you clock off you can run through your sequence of positions countering that of what you are primarily doing for the rest of the day. 

Lacing for your runners, By Podiatrist Lachie Newcombe

There are hundreds of lacing styles for shoes... here are the top ones for running shoes in particular but they too can be used for everyday shoes.

Lock Lacing

Lock lacing is a technique that increases the stability and fit through the upper of the shoe around the heel and Achilles region. It is a nifty trick in those with a narrow heel or a wider forefoot who note slipping at the rear of the shoe. It is also an excellent technique in people who wear orthotic devices as it can improve the contour of the orthotic device to the foot and arch area.

Forefoot Volume Lacing   

Volume lacing is an excellent technique used in people who have a higher instep or a wider forefoot (front of foot). In people with a higher arched foot type, a common report is that of rubbing or irritation on the top of their foot on the upper of the shoe. Volume lacing is a good hack to trial that increases the depth of the upper at the arch high point whilst not sacrificing on fit and comfort through the rest of the shoe. 

Lateral support lacing to prevent black toenails

This is an excellent technique for those athletes who notice bruising on their first toenails. It often occurs in agility sports such as netball and tennis which involve a forceful stop-start motion and subsequent rubbing and pressure on the apex of the toes against the shoe. The lateral support lacing hack alters the pull of the laces by reducing pressure on the inside (medial) aspect of the shoe where the big toe sits. By doing this a redistribution of forces can occur reducing the pressure over the big toe and toenail. 

If you need any further help with lacing techniques and hacks please feel free to come in and see our Podiatrist Lachie who is an active runner himself. Book online at www.saintegratedtherapies.com.au or 8221 6600

Happy walking or running!

Back to Basics Stretching, by Bowen Therapist Leanne Martin

Who has lower back pain, put your hands up!! Now, keep your hands up in you’re actively, constantly do stretches for this lower back pain (watching the hands go down……….)

Getting back to basics can do wonders for both your physical and mental health. In today’s society I'd say most people experience lower back aches at some stage throughout their life. Over the years even I myself have had backaches but I am lucky enough to have not only had treatment on hand but also some knowledge around what I need to do to relieve or even prevent it. So here are some stretches that I love and help when I feel like my body (and even mind) is all out of whack.

Whether your aches and pains occur from sitting in a chair all day, standing for work, long car drives, endless plane flights or postural imbalances many people don’t take the time to treat their muscles, or to stretch (Am I right?) A strong back, core and correct posture are all very important to your overall health………. at least in my opinion.

// KNEE ROCKS // Lying on your back, knees bent & feet flat on the floor, slowly rock your knees from side to side working towards a gentle stretch across your lower back. As you rock your knees back to the top & centre concentrate on drawing your stomach in to help support your spine –REPEAT 15 times each side

 

// SEAL POSE // Laying on your stomach, elbows by your side, gently lift torso/head up towards the ceiling as comfortably as you can, you will feel pinch in your lower back, again NO PAIN, hold this position for 10 – 30seconds then slowly lower back down to the floor – REPEAT if you like

 

//CHILDS POSE // Up on all fours (hands and knees) then slowly sit back on your heels as you do keep hands forward, head down & allow the spine to lengthen & stretch, hold position for 10 – 30 seconds then slowly come back up onto all fours – REPEAT if you like

 

// GLUTE STRETCH // Laying on your back, place the ankle of one leg over the thigh of opposite leg, pushing the knee away from the body to open up the hip. Bring your opposite leg up at 90 degree angle, keeping the ankle over the opposite knee, pull at the back of the leg for a Glute stretch. Hold for 15 - 30 seconds then REPEAT on other side.

 

Did this blog help you? Please let us know if it does and if you would like some individual advice or guidance around your own injuries and body please feel free to contact the clinic and book an appointment, we are always happy to help.

Love and Light,

Leanne xx

Food as Medicine: Sprouting with Spring

Food as Medicine: Sprouting with Spring

By Dr Carla Brion; Chinese Medicine | Acupuncturist

spring-daffodils_2845661b.jpg

HELLO SPRING, the element of Wood. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, spring is the season for new birth and growth. The wood element is the colour of green. It dominates the liver function of processing, detoxification and storing blood as well as the Gall Bladder, assisting in smooth Qi (energy) flow. The energy of wood moves upwards and outwards like that of a flower in bloom and embodies the emotions of positivity and assertiveness. It’s a very empowering time to make big decisions and plan for a brighter future. With spring comes creativity, vision and perspective. However, wood energy out of balance can easily turn into anger and irritability and can manifest as digestive issues, PMS, migraines and feelings of being ‘stuck’.

Spring is the perfect time to clean your home, as well as detox your body using food as medicine. The wood element is about purification so during spring, it’s important to eat foods that strengthen and cleanse the liver. Wood foods are generally cooling (yin) in nature and encourage energy to collect and contract. Eat foods like broccoli, string beans, zucchini, and leafy greens, sprouts, parsley, melons, lemons and limes. Enjoy foods with sweet and pungent flavours, limiting sour and overly spicy and greasy foods that weaken the livers function. During the cold winter, we tend to stay indoors and eat too much which can cause excessive heat in our body come springtime. Cooling foods to clear excess this heat include bananas, pears, water chestnuts, celery and cucumber. Avoid dairy as it causes ‘dampness’ and makes digestion sluggish, causing further internal heat. Because your liver is working extra hard already this time of year, it’s best to limit toxins like caffeine, alcohol and tobacco. Springs positive energy may even help you let go of unhealthy addictions to stimulants. But don’t forget to live a little and express your feelings, as wood energy is the best time to flourish and grow.

Energising Spring Tips:

-       Support that liver and bodily detoxification with a big glass of warm lemon water in the morning before you eat anything.

-       Green tea, Peppermint tea and dandelion root tea are great for their liver cleansing actions so drink up regularly.

-       Take your super-greens powder! Chlorophyll rich foods encourage liver activity and support your wood element within.

-       Get outdoors and ground yourself in nature. Walk bare foot in a park or sink your feet into some cool beach sand.

-       Get help! Try acupuncture to help with colds and flus and reduce the symptoms of sinusitis and hay fever. Traditional Chinese Herbal medicine can also help with allergies, excess mucus and inflammation.